Archive for the ‘Stand-Up’ Category

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Outback Concerts Presents

Jim Gaffigan

Friday · August 14 · 8 p.m.
Tickets on Sale Friday, March 6 at 10 a.m.

Lawn Tickets/$39.75

Reserved Seats/$59.75

Reserved Table Seats/$59.75

Tickets can be purchased at Booth Amphitheatre (Monday – Friday, noon – 6 p.m.) or through etix.com. By phone call (800) 514-3849

Etix hours: Monday-Friday/ 9 a.m.- 8 p.m. EST

Saturday/10 a.m. – 8 p.m. EST & Sunday/noon – 8 p.m. EST

 

For complete concert information go to www.boothamphitheatre.com or call (919) 462-2025.

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In addition to EasternCarolinaStyle.com, Michael Smith is also a regular contributing writer for the Fayetteville, NC weekly newspaper, Up and Coming Weekly.

This week’s edition of Up and Coming Weekly features an article about Ron White’s upcoming show at the Crown Theatre on January 9th.

Click the link below to read more
(You will be routed to UpandComingWeekly.com)

Michael Smith at Up and Coming Weekly

 

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MAS – With your show Legit coming back for a second season, how has your life changed? I’m sure you are quite a bit busier, but in general what is going on in Jim Jefferies’ life right now?

JJ – It’s the same as when the first seasoned launched. This time, more people know about the show and it has a bit of a fan base. The first season, people were trying to figure out what the show is and now we are trying to live up to the first season. I think this new season is substantially better than season one.

Other than that, doing all the press and stuff, I enjoy that. I’m doing Kimmell soon and hopefully I can do all the other ones. I enjoy that aspect, getting on the couch and talking with people.

MAS – With the show moving from FX to the new network FXX, are you expecting any type of impact from that?

JJ – There will be a small drop-off in the ratings because FXX is available in less homes, it is just simple math. The thing about FXX is, it’s a start-up network. It’s good to be on the ground floor and to be a flagship show of the network. I get to be the face of the station, if you will. It’s us, The League, and Its Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and they also just bought The Simpsons for that channel. They are also working on 4-5 new shows. I think this time next year this station will be said in the same breath as FX. It will be its own identity, obviously, with more comedy on it than FX.

MAS – That’s one of the things I am enjoying about seeing the show on FX, or in the FX family. In watching the show, I tried to think of where else you would fit. There aren’t a lot of networks that would give you the freedom that you have now.

JJ – I don’t know if we have gone too far to ever be syndicated or to be put on TBS or anything like that. It’s probably, in a business point of view, a bad idea to do that. There is something about making a show that is genuinely unique. I don’t think anyone has seen anything on TV similar to it. People can argue, that Louie is a comic playing himself or Seinfeld is a comic playing himself. But the storylines that we are doing, I don’t think you are seeing anything like it. Especially considering one of our main characters has muscular dystrophy in a comedy.

MAS – Are you still shooting now, or are you all completely done?

JJ – No we finished shooting in December. There are only three of us that write the show. I try to write all the storylines and the other guys direct while I act in them. We don’t have several different directors so we can edit while we are making them, we have to edit after. We have to finish up with enough time to get the first episode out. So we finished filming a couple of months ago.

MAS – You mentioned having a character such as the one DJ Qualls plays. What kind of feedback did you receive after, or during, season one with his depiction of an individual with a physical limitation?

JJ – Everything we have received has been very positive after it aired. Before it aired, we were getting a lot of mail that said we were being insensitive and they hadn’t even seen it yet. I think that they thought that since it was a comedy that we were going to be doing disabled gags the whole time. I mean we did do a couple of them, but the point of the whole show is that his character is treated the same as everyone else’s character. We worked very hard at that. Obviously his character has limitations when you are writing for him, but we involve him in every scene. When you get the other disabled actors on… I know from just working with them, they enjoy working on my show more than do working on a Hallmark movie where they may be a depressed, sad kid at school. Or they may be in a PSA after it. Once you see the show, you don’t feel sorry for anybody on it. I don’t think there is any hate or malice in it.

MAS – With the premise of the show being you playing a comedian, you pull things from your day-to-day life. With the upcoming season, are we looking at more of the same or are you going in some different directions with the characters?

JJ – Each episode is more serialized in this season compared to the first one. Season one was more vaguely serialized, not saying you can’t watch individual episodes out of season two and still get enough out of it to enjoy it. My character has a full arc, Steve has a full arc where he goes into alcoholism… I think we learned a lot from writing the first season which was largely based on my stand-up.

The entire first season was written before we cast anybody. So we didn’t know what the actors were going to be good or bad at. We didn’t know we’d get DJ Qualls or John Ratzenberger. So now, we start writing it based around the strength of the actor and where they are going to be able to take the character. Where you never thought the character could go before.

In season one Steve Nugent was so one-dimensional, then Dan Bakkedahl came along. He is such a good “improver.” I realized that he made such a good drunk that this year I made him an alcoholic.

MAS – The tour you are on now is obviously new material. Is it something that you are using towards a new comedy special or are you just focused on Legit?

JJ – Some bits and pieces I did on the last tour, but for the most part it is all new material. There is nothing that you have ever see me do on one of my specials. If you only have ever watched me on TV, you have never seen any of these jokes.

I will be recording a new special in Boston in couple months. It will probably be 6 months later when we release it. I am fine with the network who will release it, I can’t say who it is yet. I could do that special tomorrow. I am ready to retire some of this material and start fresh again.

There will be a lot of stuff that I will be doing in the show at the theatre that won’t make it into the special or even the next special after that one. I try to keep an hour ahead of myself.

MAS – As far as the future, most talents tend to pick one or the other; stand-up tours or TV. Are you the type that is going to try and do both or do you see a time when show like the one in Durham will be less frequent?

JJ – I think I will always be a little better at stand-up comedy than I will be at acting. Maybe I will get good at acting or something. I always feel like that when I am acting that I am having an affair from comedy. Comedy is my wife and acting is this mistress that I see occasionally. Comedy is my main gig and I think it always will be.

MAS – I recently spoke with Gary Owen from Think Like a Man and Ride Along and he said he has to keep doing stand-up to stay sharp because acting makes him soft. Is that true for you too?

JJ – Once I finish a TV show it takes me another month to get back into the swing of things. I have to push myself and go out every night until I get good at it. I am back in the swing at the moment, everything is good. When I get to Durham it will be great.

MAS – If you could get anything across to the folks attending the show coming up, what would it be?

JJ – In my mind I would say something like, “There is no God” or something else like that. I just don’t give a shit anymore.

The main thing I want to get across is that I want them to have a good time. I’m not going to try and change anyone’s opinion. I’m going to give my opinions and you can do with them what you want. If you don’t agree, keep yours and just wait for the next joke.

 

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Bio courtesy Comedy Central

Solidly ensconced in the 30-40 demographic, comedian Todd Glass may now be considered ineligible to be labeled a wunderkind — but he certainly was one, having launched his career in comedy at age 16. Since that precocious start, the Philadelphia native has developed into a polished performer with a bent for inventive material that often mocks the conventions of standup.

Todd’s comedy is often satirical, sometimes irreverent but always funny. His television appearances are many, including performances on “The Sarah Silverman Show,” “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” “Late Night with Conan O?Brien,” “Showbiz Show with David Spade,” “Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn” and “Politically Incorrect.” With his unique delivery and divergent style of witticisms, Todd quickly becomes a host and viewer favorite.

This weekend Goodnight’s Comedy Club in Raleigh will play host to the nationally regarded funnyman, Todd Glass. You have seen him on all of the late night talk shows and on the occasional episode of Tosh.0. Todd will perform 5 shows starting Thursday and wrapping up Saturday night.

MAS – I recently took the opportunity to go on to Netflix and watch your comedy special. I was really impressed; I really like your comedic style. I have seen you on Tosh.0 and other stuff like that, but that is a little different. Where does your style come from, how did you develop that?

Todd Glass – I guess for everybody it is a little different. For me, I guess, the more you do comedy hopefully you start talking about things that mean something to you. It doesn’t have to be social or political, although it could be. It could be, also, anything that means something to you. It’s just something personal. Maybe that is the best way to put, something personal.  Personal has a wide array… it’s wide as to what personal means.

I always use the example of, because it helped me when I was starting comedy, Steve Martin. He talked about something personal, even though it was silliness. It was something that was personal to him, this very unique silliness. It wasn’t a formulaic generic silliness that he tapped into, it was something personal. I think that is where it comes from, hopefully.

MAS – You mentioned Steve Martin, what other comedians have you looked to for guidance, who has molded you?

Todd Glass – Indirectly, probably a lot of comedians. Mostly, the things is, comedians that I always say, make me want to punch somebody that is sitting next to me or punch a wall because you are laughing so hard. They are the ones I tend to… Over the years, whether it’s comedians in my generation… Legends, like Rodney or Don Rickles guys in sort of my camp whether it is Brian Regan… I’m a big Eddie Pepitone fan. I tend to watch guys that make me want to punch somebody because I am laughing so hard. Those are that guys that probably make you.

MAS – From your style of comedy, and from the material you used in your special, you are not afraid to tackle some of the more politically incorrect issues all for a little social commentary, if not satire. I have seen you do it in a way that isn’t necessarily family friendly, but also not your typical R Rated comedy. You seem to have found success in your shows with tackling these issues while keeping your show as clean as it is.

Todd Glass – I don’t give people anybody credit for being clean; I give people credit for being funny. So, it is probably just naturally what I talk about, but I never want to make it sound like, “That’s the best way to do it.” Obviously, it’s hard to be fucking hilarious whether it’s clean or what we perceive to be blue. We see a lot of comedians that use language, not at its best. But I’ve seen guys with not one curse in their act that use suck and blow and others. There are tools, there are clean tricks too; they are both offensive to me. I really don’t ever give anybody credit…

I give people credit for just finding a way to be unique and funny. If you give people extra credit, if you go, “and plus your clean and that’s the hardest.” No it’s not. You are sort of saying, “Richard Pryor and George Carlin are funny alright, but you gotta admit they took the easier path”; of course not!  It is sort of just who I am.

MAS – Let me put my question into better context. I have done several interviews with various comedians. I have interviewed comedians that actually bill themselves as family friendly comedy. I have also interviewed comedians that are the polar opposite to that. Both styles can lead one to being a very successful comedian. I am in no position to say who has it easier and who has it harder but, those two styles are so dramatically different you have to appreciate a comic that has chosen to do things that way. Why did they choose to do things that way?

Todd Glass – If they are a good comedian, they didn’t choose it. Maybe, it is just who they are. It’s like people that don’t do comedy, they might not choose to be who they are, but it is part of who they are. So I think it is just representing what makes them laugh, if you are doing it right. I think whenever you decide to please an audience, and give them what they want; it is probably a sure sign if you are not really enjoying yourself onstage.

It’s like if you were doing artwork and you were painting and I ask, “What do you do?”  You answer, “Well, I try to figure out what people like, and then I paint it.” Well, is that fun?

MAS – I am hearing that you like to do what pleases you and if somebody else finds it funny, great.

Todd Glass – I do want to make a living doing this, but I think the ultimate goal is go onstage each night and express what is in your heart and what you feel and at the same time you find an audience that appreciates it.

The Todd Glass Show – Podcast
Follow on Twitter @ToddGlass
Facebook Todd Glass Show

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When: March 13, 2014
Where: The Carolina Theatre, Durham
Tickets: Here

Actor, writer, producer and comedian Jim Jefferies announces his new live tour ‘Day Streaming’ set to stop at 31 cities Spring 2014.  ‘Day Streaming’ will be Jefferies first full North American tour. The tour is produced by AEG Live.

Jefferies is the creator and star of Legit, an edgy, controversial original comedy series which returns to FXX for a second season on January 8.  In Legit, Jefferies portrays a heightened version of himself as a comedian from Australia who realizes there’s more to life (and his career) than the rock and roll lifestyle of stand up comedy.  Prior to Legit, Jefferies has appeared on numerous TV shows in England including Channel 4’s The History of Offensive Humor, BBC1’s Heaven and Earth, and ITV2’s Comedy Cults. U.S. audiences got their first taste of Jefferies when he appeared on HBO’s Down and Dirty with Jim Norton which in turn lead to his critically acclaimed and international hit one hour HBO special, I Swear to God.  He followed that up with a Showtime special titled Alchoholocaust and Fully Functional on The EPIX Network.

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When: March 10, 2014
Where: The Carolina Theatre Durham
Tickets: Here
Aziz Ansari: Modern Romance

Aziz Ansari is one of the biggest stars in the comedy world. Rolling Stone put him on the cover of their special comedy issue labeling him “the funniest man under 30.”

He recently debuted his much anticipated third hour-long stand-up special “Buried Alive” on Netflix in November. The special was named one of the best standup specials of the year by The Onion AV Club and Paste Magazine.

Ansari co-stars opposite Amy Poehler in the beloved Emmy-nominated NBC series Parks and Recreation, which is now in its sixth season. Ansari’s portrayal of government employee ‘Tom Haverford’ has earned him critical praise including Entertainment Weekly naming him one of their “Breakout TV Stars,” TV Guide naming him a “Scene Stealer” and People Magazine naming him 2011’s “Funniest Dude in Prime Time.”

Additionally, Ansari has landed a book deal with The Penguin Press about modern dating and how the basic issues facing a single person—whom we meet, how we meet them, and what happens next—have been radically altered by new technologies.

Ansari has also kept busy in the film world. His voice was featured in the Twentieth Century Fox animated hit film Epic, and he made a cameo in This Is The End opposite Seth Rogen and James Franco. He was previously seen starring in the action comedy 30 Minutes or Less opposite Jesse Eisenberg and Danny McBride and Universal’s Funny People. Additional film credits include Get Him to the Greek, I Love You, Man, Observe and Report, and Ice Age: Continental Drift.

Ansari’s stand up work has been unparalleled over the past few years. His second hour-long stand-up special “Dangerously Delicious” was self-released online through AzizAnsari.com for $5. In 2010, he had an hour-long standup special on Comedy Central titled “Intimate Moments for a Sensual Evening.” The special and subsequent DVD/CD were both extremely successful and both albums continue to be a mainstay on iTunes’ comedy best-seller list.

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Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC)

Durham, NC

April 5, 2014

Superstar comedian, author and talk show host Chelsea Handler embarks on a national stand-up comedy tour in support of the release of her fifth book, Uganda Be Kidding Me

Perhaps best known as the outspoken host of E!’s late night talk show, “Chelsea Lately,” Handler continues to offer international audiences her fearless honesty and tongue-in-cheek commentary every weeknight. “I’ve decided to go on tour and support my new book, Uganda Be Kidding Me. I think we all know how much I love the sound of my own voice” said Handler.

Handler’s latest book Uganda Be Kidding Me will release on March 4th. In this hilarious and absurd collection of travel essays Chelsea delivers some of her favorite stories while also giving travelers her (not to be believed) guide to etiquette, hot spots, and answers to some of the most asked travel questions.

Tickets: HERE

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PNC Arena

Raleigh, NC

April 4, 2014

w/ Special Guest:

MikeEpps_300x225Mike Epps

Katt Williams returns to PNC Arena on Friday, April 4, 2014 with a brand new stand-up show that is selling out across the country – “Katt Williams: Growth Spurt.” The hilarious show features the critically acclaimed comic at his best and makes it clear that he is in no rush to slow down. Katt’s high-energy stage presence and fresh routine has left every audience cramping in their sides from laughter and rising to their feet with a standing ovation, begging for more.

Known to many for his breakout role in the MTV improv show, “Wild n’ Out,” and his widely recognized role as “Money Mike” in the hit movie “Friday After Next,” Williams already has several successful stand-up specials under his belt, such as “Kattpacalypse,” “Pimpin Pimpin,” and “The Pimp Chronicles.”

Check KattWilliams.com for more information.

Tickets: HERE

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America’s Favorite Comedian

Bill Cosby

Comedy Central “Far From Finished Tour”

Durham Performing Arts Center
October 25, 2014

One of America’s most beloved comedians of all time Bill Cosby, whose comedy transcends age, gender and cultural barriers, is making a rare appearance at DPAC on Saturday, October 25, 2014. Cosby returns to DPAC in his new Comedy Central “Far From Finished Tour”, following multiple sellout performances on previous tours in 2009 and 2012.

Tickets on sale:

Online at DPACnc.com

DPAC Ticket Center: 919.680.2787, 123 Vivian Street, Durham, NC

Ticketmaster.com / Ticketmaster Charge by phone at 800.745.3000

“Bill Cosby joins a short list of elite performers that have been to DPAC three times since our opening in 2008. It’s great to know that superstars like Cosby keep coming back, both because they love the atmosphere at DPAC and because Triangle audiences love to laugh. There is no better place to see great comedy than DPAC and this chance to present one of comedy’s legends is very special,” said Bob Klaus, GM of DPAC.

Perhaps Cosby’s greatest contribution to American entertainment and culture is The Cosby Show, about a close-knit, upper class black family. Cosby said his intent was to portray an American family. Time magazine called the show “an encouraging sign of maturity in matters of race.” The Cosby Show dominated the No. 1 spot for years, earning nearly unanimous critical praise. Life magazine described the program as “a gentle, whimsical, warmhearted” show whose “delicious ordinariness of its pleasures and tribulations has given millions a fresh, laughter-splashed perspective on their own domestic lives.”

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MAS – You have been in comedy touring for around 20 years and have been to, easily, hundreds of cities and played in hundreds of venues. Looking back, which of your shows do you feel like is your crowning achievement to date?

Bruce Bruce – I don’t really know, I don’t think I have gotten to that point yet. All the shows I have ever done in any theater or in any club I have so much fun and all of my crowds are basically the same. Also, I always give 100% with whatever I do. So, I haven’t gotten to that theater yet where I think I achieve anything like that. I am still out there having fun.

MAS – On the other side of that, are there any shows that you have done that you wish you could do over again?

Bruce Bruce – Oh yeah, there are shows that I wish I could go do again. I have never had one that I can’t go back to, never had a bad show. But shows that I would like to do again, I would like to host BET Comic View again. The previous show that I did, I thought that it was very good and it was a very good year. I think we had over 2 million viewers, and that was pretty good.

MAS – What is there in your career that you would like to do that you haven’t already done?

Bruce Bruce – I would like to host my own TV talk-show. I would like to host a show like Johnny Carson. I think I could get anybody to do the show and I think I am a great person to interview them. I have the personality for it. That’s one thing I’d like to do. I’d like to have a long run like Jay Leno, who took over for Carson. I’d like to have a show like that. I’d like to have the desk, I’d like to have the whole setup, couch everything.

MAS – I forget which show it was that I was watching of yours, but I watched you go person to person lighting them up joking on them as they were walking to their seats during your set. Have you ever really pissed anybody off doing that?

Bruce Bruce – Yeah, I think I have pissed someone off but I have a way of making it up to them right there onstage. I don’t know how I do it, but I have seen people really get pissed and then said things to them and done some things to them in the midst of the show and they have forgotten about the whole entire thing. They are laughing and loving it, they are like “First, you pissed me off, but we really like you, you are really good.” By the way, when I do it, it is nothing degrading, nothing personal, nothing to intimidate you, it’s all in fun. If I see a big guy, I’m gonna talk about me and him. He’s gonna think the joke is on me and him, but it’s really on him. He doesn’t realize it, but that is how I do it, a maneuver that I do.

MAS – You have a huge library of material, like an encyclopedia Britannica of comedy to pull from. What can we expect from you?

Bruce Bruce – Definitely different, I have different stuff that I do. Also, I do a meet and greet after each show. I always have the, “Why didn’t you do that joke?” Some people really want to hear some of the old stuff, so a lot of time when I go out on stage I ask, “What do you want to hear?” because a lot of time people just want to hear the old stuff, I definitely have new stuff that is really, really good. The key thing is how my show goes…You go to a comedy show and you see the comedian and they give you a roller-coaster ride. One minute they are very funny and then they come down and then they go back up again and then they come down. I don’t do the roller-coaster ride, I pick you up and I leave you right there. That is my whole goal, I want to pick you up and leave you laughing right there. I don’t do the roller-coaster ride; that is not comfortable to me. I come do a great job, so I am going to pick you up and up.

MAS – I have talked to some of the more controversial comedy acts; Jim Norton, Tracey Morgan, etc. They are all not afraid to push the envelope in subject matter. In hearing your set, you talk about some of the same subjects; race, women, sex, etc. but with a completely different tone. What has pushed you to use that type of material and the tone that you use?

Bruce Bruce – Well, honestly… I think, once you have a person’s attention, once you get their attention you can just about sell them on anything. When you go to church, you go anywhere, you go to a seminar; once they have your attention; you have a tendency of listening. When I have people’s attention I think that is my outlet, especially with guys, to let them know about racism, and relationships; I do a lot on relationships. They need to know these things. A lot of guys, they don’t know, they think they know because they feel they are a grown man, “I’m a grown man now, I’m a big man,” a lot of time we just don’t know. Once I have their attention, I just lay it on them and it just comes natural for me.

MAS – You have been in this business for around 20 years…

Bruce Bruce – 24 years in 2014, I’ve been doing it for 24 years professionally.

MAS – That kind of experience makes you a subject matter expert; you are the man to ask. Let’s pretend I am an up-and-coming comedian, I want to be the next Bruce Bruce… How do I do it?

Bruce Bruce – The key thing is, you have to have a passion. I need to know if you have a passion for doing stand-up. If you do have a passion for it, be creative and use your own material. Don’t take bits a pieces of other people’s material. I can see you taking somebody’s style, but not their material. Use it to your advantage. It’s not hard to pick up a lot of material. I tell every young comedian, I go up to the mall and I sit and I watch people and that is how I gather my material. I learn things about the city, so when I come up on stage I’m gonna say something about the city that you think I don’t know anything about. It is about bringing creativity and being original and using your own material. Energy, you’ve got to have energy, but first and foremost, you’ve got to have the passion for it. If you have that passion, you can go to the top…